Executives are concerned about Millennials entering the workforce, yet they aren't making any special plans for managing them.

0%
Executives say Millennials entering
the workforce are having an impact on
workforce strategy.
0%
Fewer executives say their firm is giving
special attention to the particular wants
and needs of Millennials.

BUT MILLENNIALS DO NEED TO BE MANAGED DIFFERENTLY, IN TERMS OF FEEDBACK AND DEVELOPMENT.

50%
Millennials want informal feedback
50% more often than their non-Millennial colleagues.
16%
16% say they have received the most professional development from formal mentoring at work over the past three years, compared with 12% of non-Millennials.
16%
16% say they have received the most professional development from formal training at work over the past three years, compared with 10% of non-Millennials.

Myths about Millennials

Much has been said about what Millennials want most from work,
but our research suggests that some of these ideas are not accurate.

MYTH
Millennials care
more about making
a positive difference
in the world.
21%
of Millennials say
making a positive
difference in the world
is important to their job
satisfaction, vs. 20%
of non-Millennials.
MYTH
Achieving work/life
balance is more
important to
Millennials than
to others.
29%
of Millennials say
achieving work/life
balance is important to
their job satisfaction,
vs. 31% of
non-Millennials.
MYTH
Meeting income goals
is less important to
Millennials as long as
they are learning
and growing.
32%
of Millennials prioritize
meeting income
goals, followed
distantly by learning
and growing
(13%).
MYTH
Finding personal
meaning in their work
is more important
to Millennials.
14%
of Millennials say
finding personal meaning
in their work is important
to job satisfaction,
vs. 17% of non-
Millennials.

Understanding the real differences between Millennials and older workers should come before making big changes to workforce management.